B-2-9 Jonathan Lewter son of Matthew Luter and Sarah Parnell was born on 05 Aug 1818 in Autauga County, Al.. He died on 21 Jun 1903 in Dexter, Cooke County, Tx.. He was buried in North Dexter Cemetery, Cooke County, Tx.. He married Mary Ann Worrell daughter of Bryant Worrell and Dorcas Byrd. She was born on 09 Jan 1825 in SC. She died in Aug 1886 in Camp San Saba, McCullock County, Tx..

 

Jonathan Lewter and Mary Ann Worrell were married on 07 Jan 1841 in Autauga County, Al.. They had the following children:

 

B-3-46 Robert Bowlin Lewter was born on 07 Oct 1842 in Coosa County, Al.. He was buried on 01 Oct 1913 in Oakwood Cemetery, Tyler, Smith County, Tx.. He died on 01 Oct 1913 in Tyler, Smith County, Texas

 

B-3-47 Margaret F. Lewter was born on 11 Aug 1844 in Coosa County, Al.. She died on 26 Sep 1864 in Troup, Smith County, Tx..

 

B-3-48 Dallas Knox Worth Lewter was born on 12 Nov 1847 in Troup, Smith County, Tx.. He married Callie T. Little on 21 Nov 1872 in Cooke County, Tx.. He died on 25 Jan 1938 in Dexter, Cooke County, Tx.. He was buried in North Dexter Cemetery, Cooke County, Tx..

 

B-3-49 Martha Susan Lewter was born on 22 May 1851 in Troup, Smith County, Tx.. She married Dillon Pardee Lamb on 18 Dec 1872 in Cooke County, Tx.. She died on 02 Aug 1933 in Dexter, Cooke County, Tx.. She was buried in North Dexter Cemetery, Cooke County, Tx..

 

B-3-50 Harriett J. Lewter was born on 31 Mar 1854 in Troup, Smith County, Tx.. She died on 05 Jul 1862 in Troup, Smith County, Tx..

 

B-3-51 Henry Wise Lewter was born on 16 Apr 1857 in Troup, Smith County, Tx.. He married Laura Matilda Meador on 06 Jul 1876 in Cooke County, Tx.. He died on 05 Aug 1938 in Dalhart, Hartley County, Tx. (Auto Accident). He was buried in Elmhurst Cemetery, Guymon, Texas County, Ok..

 

B-3-52 Mary Elizabeth Lewter was born on 25 Feb 1860. She died on 26 Sep 1864.

 

 

Notes for Jonathan Lewter:

 

Jonathan and Mary Ann moved to Rusk County, Tx. in 1845, then to Smith County, Tx., in 1847. Jonathan was tax assessor and collector in Smith County in 1847. He was in the State Legislature in 1857, and re-elected in 1859. He attained rank of Captain in Confederate Army, Co. D, 15th Reg. Texas Infantry. Jonathan was elected to State Legislature again in 1866. He moved to Cooke County, Tx., in 1871, to Camp San Saba in 1883 (in McCullock County), to Marietta, Ok., in 1890. He returned to Texas and lived with his children until his death. Jonathan joined the Masonic Lodge, Canton #98, Omen, Tx. in 1851. He transferred his membership to Dexter Lodge #372, in 1872; Camp San Saba

#555 in 1883 and Dexter Lodge again in 1890.

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1850 Census, Smith County, Tx. 23 Oct. 1850, Page 125

294 296 Lewter, Jonathan 32 M Ass't Tax Collector 160 Al.

Mary Ann 25 F Al.

Dr. Robert B. 8 M Al.

Margaret E. 6 F Al.

Dallas K.W. 3 M Tx.

Worrell, Bryant 60 M Wheel Wright NC

Greer, John A. 35 M Wheel Wright Ga.

Lewter, Mathew 28 M Farmer Al.

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1860 Census, Smith County, Tx.

Lewter, J. 42 M Al. Farmer 750 1000

Mary 35 F SC

Margaret 15 F Al.

Dallis 12 M Tx.

Martha 9 F Tx.

Harriet 6 F Tx

Henry 3 M Tx.

Mary 4m F Tx.

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1880 Census, Cooke, Texas

Family History Library Film 1255298 NA Film Number T9-1298 Page #246D

Name Relation Marital Status Gender Race Age Birthplace Occupation Father's Birthplace Mother's

Birthplace

Jonathan LEWTER Self M Male W 62 ALA Farming VA ...

Mary LEWTER Wife M Female W 55 SC House Keeping NC

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Laura Matilda Meador Lewter's husband Henry was the son of Jonathan Lewter, who was a state legislator in Texas (both before and after the civil war) and was elected 3-times as tax assessor-collector of Smith County in the 1850s. He was captain of a Civil War regiment from the county and some of his Civil War documents are on display in Tyler at the Smith County Historical

Society building."

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THINGS WISE AND OTHERWISE "Some Biographies of Old Settlers."

Historical, Personal and Reminiscent. Volume I By Sid S. Johnson, 1900:

Sid S. Johnson, Publisher, Tyler, Texas

Chapter X - Pages 52-58

 

Johnathan Lewter may be living somewhere in West Texas-I have no recent information concerning him. Lewter occupied many positions of honor and trust in Smith county. He has filled the offices of county treasurer, tax collector and represented Smith county in the legislature. He had a limited education, but was a man of strong native force of character and will power. He was popular with the people and in a still hunt after office he was a lucky man. I remember well a

heated contest for legislature honors in this county about 1857.

 

Ex-governor R.B. Hubbard, Col. Geo. W. Clinton and Johnathan Lewter were the candidates, with two to be elected. Chilton and Hubbard inspired a rivalry among their friends, and Lewter apparently moved along in his quiet way being lost sight of in the deal. Chilton and Hubbard were giants in oratory and logic and the powers of debate. They canvassed the county, and were met at every speaking by a large crowd of admiring friends. Chilton and Hubbard vied with each other

in eloquence wit and repartee. Jonathan went around with his coat and talked to the boys. When his time came to speak he made a common-place talk without any reference to his opponents.

 

The election came off, Chilton and Hubbard not very far apart but Lewter was "out o'sight". Lewter and Hubbard were elected and Johnathan worked his political rabbit foot with success.

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JONATHAN LEWTER, PIONEER

by Andrew L. Leath

 

Jonathan Lewter, pioneer Smith County settler, office holder, and Civil War

captain, was a well known and highly respected figure in Smith County's

early days. He was born August 5, 1818 in Autauga County, Albama, the

son of Matthew and Sarah (Parnell) Lewter. He was raised in Alabama

and married Mary Ann Worrell in 1841 in Coosa County, Alabama. They

moved to Rusk County, Texas in 1845 and to Smith County in 1847 as

had other members of the Worrell family.

 

Lewter first settled on eighty acres of land near present day Mason

Cemetery northeast of Arp. He sold this land in 1852. Though limited

in education, Lewter was a practical man with good common sense.

He ran for Smith County tax assessor in 1850 and won the post. He

was subsequently elected to the same office in 1852, 1854, and 1856.

Lewter's father died in 1852, and his mother and several siblings came

to Texas. John Wells Lewter was a clerk and later merchant at Canton

(present day Omen) in the 1850's. Joseph P. Lewter and Peter Harrison

Lewter also lived in Smith County at various dates. A sister Virginia A.

Lewter married George W. Cook, son of Jesse and Eleanor Cook who

lived in the Bascom community in Smith County.

 

In 1857 Lewter ran for state representative from the seventeenth district

against Richard B. Hubbard and George W. Chilton. An observer of the

election wrote in later years: .......two (were) to be elected. Chilton and Hubbard inspired a rivalry among their friends, and Lewter apparently moved along in his quiet way being lost sight of in the deal. Chilton and Hubbard were giants in

oratory and logic and the powers of debate. They canvassed the county,

and were met at every speaking by a large crowd of admiring friends.

Chilton and Hubbard vied with each other in eloquence, wit and repartee.

Jonathan went around with his coat and talked to the boys. When his time

came to speak he made a common-place talk without any special reference

to his opponents. The election came off, Chilton and Hubbard not very far

apart, but Lewter was out "o'sight." Lewter and Hubbard were elected, and

Jonathan worked his political rabbit-foot with success.

 

Lewter won election again in 1859.

 

When the Civil War broke out in 1861, Lewter enlisted in October 1861, as

a First Lieutenant in J.M. Douglas' company which became Company F,

Thirteenth Texas Volunteers. The regiment reorganized in March 1862

and the company was transferred to the Fifteenth Texas infantry as

Second Company D. Lewter became captain of the company and served

in that position throughout the war. A son and three brothers also served

in this company.

 

After the war Lewter returned to his Smith County farm near present day

New Chapel Hill which he bought in 1855. He was again elected Smith

County's representative to the Texas Legislature.

 

Lewter left Smith County about 1869 and moved to Cooke County, Texas,

near Dexter. In 1883 Lewter and other members of the family moved to

Camp San Saba in MuCulloch County. Mary Ann Worrell Lewter died here

in 1886. The Lewters were cattlemen in McCulloch County. After anthrax

attacked their cattle and almost wiped them out, the family traveled by

wagon in 1890 to present day Marietta, Oklahoma. Lewter lived with

various children until his death June 21, 1903 in Dexter, Texas and

was buried there. Four children lived to maturity and survived him:

Doctor Robert Bowlin Lewter, Dallas Knox Worth Lewter, Martha S.

Lewter (married D. Lamb), and Henry Wise Lewter.

 

His grandchildren remembered him as a kind and gentle man and could

not imagine him in war. When they would ask him if he killed anyone,

he would reply, "How do I know? We were all shooting, and I don't know

if the bullets I shot hit anyone."

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LEWTER, JONATHAN (18181903). Jonathan Lewter, also spelled Luter, legislator, was born on August 5, 1818, in Autauga County, Alabama, son of Matthew and Sarah (Parnell) Lewter. He married Mary A. Worrell of South Carolina on January 7, 1841. The couple moved to Rusk County, Texas, in

1845. In 1847 they settled in Smith County. In 1850 Lewter was elected assessor and collector of Smith County. He remained in that position for seven years. He resigned in 1857 after being elected to the Texas House of Representatives. He was re-elected in 1859. Lewter spoke out in favor ofsecession at a mass meeting in Smith County in January 1861. Lewter served as the captain of Company F of the Fifteenth Texas Infantry during the Civil War. He joined in October 1861 and remained a captain until the end of the war. After the war he served in the

Eleventh Legislature in 1866. Around 1869 Lewter and his family moved to Dexter, Cooke County. In the 1880 census for Cooke County, Lewter listed his occupation as farmer.

 

Mary Lewter died in 1886 and is buried in McCulloch County. Jonathan Lewter died in Dexter on June 21, 1903.

 

BIBLIOGRAPHY: William DeRyee and R. E. Moore., The Texas Album of the Eighth Legislature.

(Austin: Miner, Lambert, and Perry, 1860). Family Search, "Jonathan Lewter"

(http://www.familysearch.org), accessed August 14, 2006. Smith County Rootsweb

(http://rootsweb.com/~txsmith/pioneers/dean/mjdean.html), accessed August 14, 2006. Rose Denson,

"Bryant Worrell" (http://crhailey.tripod.com/worrellhist/bryantsoff.html), accessed August 14, 2006.

Stephanie P. Niemeyer

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Confederate Pension Application Files - Cooke County, Texas

Lewter, Jonathan 00960

Claimant: Lewter, Jonathan

Pension Number: 00960

County: Cooke