A-3-24  Kinchen D. Lewter was born on 12 Jul 1840 in Elkton, Giles County, Tn.. He died on 16 Feb 1869 in Burnsville, Miss.. He was probably buried in the Lewter Cemetery, Giles County, Tn.. He married Margaret (Maggie) Mae Nave (Cave?) daughter of James Cave and Rebecca Garrett Gardner. She was born in Sep 1847 in Al.. She died about 1907 in Hebron, Clark County, Ark. She was probably buried in Davis Cem., Vaden, Clark County, Ark..

 

Kinchen D. Lewter and Margaret (Maggie) Mae Nave (Cave?) were married about 1862. They had the following children:

 

A-4.65  William Lewter was born in 1863. He died after 1876.

 

A-4-66  Fannie Lewter was born in 1863. She died in 1866.

Notes for Fannie Lewter:

According to family tradition, Fannie died when she was 3 yrs old.

 

A-4-67  Eva Lilian Lewter was born on 27 Nov 1863 in Giles County, Tn.. She married James T. Owens on 12 Jan 1881 in Clark County, Ark.. She died on 07 Mar 1941 in Gurdon, Clark County, Ark. She was buried in Davis Cemetery, Clark County, Ark.

 

A-4-68  Jessie T. Lewter was born in 1869 in Giles County, Tn.. She married Walter Pendleton Vaden before 1893 in Clarke County, Ark.. She died about 1937 in Vaden, Clark County, Ark. She was buried in Davis Cemetery, Clark County, Ark.

 

 

Notes for Kinchen D. Lewter:

 

Kinchen Lewter Family Bible as per Gerald Vaden

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1870 Census, Dist. 1, Giles County, Tn. 24 August 1870, Page 15

96 96 Luter, Jane 70 F W Farmer 1900 300 NC

Marthy 23 F W Keep House Al.

Liley 7 F W Miss.

William 3 F W Tn.

Jessie 1 F W Tn.

Alexander 23 M W Farmer Al.

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Copied from newspapers at the Athens Library. I don't know if Bobby meant

the Athens Archives or The Athens Library.

 

DAVENPORT. Early on Feb. 16 at Burnsville, Miss., on the M&C railroad three men lost their lives; a band of desperadoes had infested the country around Burnsville for some time, ever since the war under Davenport. The gang had laid a plan to waylay and rob the M&C at Burnsville on Feb., 15 and were betrayed and were attacked. Davenport was shot dead and two of the gang captured.

Sheriff started to take them to Jacinto, Miss., and they were overtaken by party of men who took the prisoners from them and put them to death. (Memphis Daily Appeal, 18 Feb. 1869.) Jack Davenport, an outlaw, was one of the bravest spirits the late war produced. He once repulsed ten mounted Federal soldiers single-handed and alone near Dickson Depot, Al. wounding four or five of them and

capturing horses, pistols, overcoats. He was from Hardin County, TN. and of respectable parents. He quit the regular army to become guerrilla and since the war has ended has been a professional horse thief. According to the Iuka Gazette the following were killed. Tobe Charlton of Eastport, Miss.,

R. D. Luter of Pulaski in Tenn.; and George Kincaid of Moscow, TN. Their bodies are now lying on the platform. (Memphis Daily Apeal, 22 Feb. 1869)

(They still used R. D. Luter instead of the K. but we know this is Kinchen with the three different

articles.)

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A Newspaper Article about Kinchen D. Lewter

This article appeared in a historical edition of the Corinth Herald dated December 15, 1903. It recounts the events leading to the death of Kinchen D. Lewter at the hands of members of the Ku Klux Klan. Kinchen D. Lewter was the first husband of Margaret (Maggie) Mae Cave, daughter of James Cave and Rebecca Garrett Gardner.

 

Two Killed at Burnsville

In the fall of 1868 Jack Hardwick hauled to Burnsville and sold a bale of cotton. Later in the day he was held up in the streets and the money taken from him by Jack Davenport, who was credited with being the leader of a gang of hard characters infesting that neighborhood. Hardwick subcribed to an affidavit setting forth the above facts and a warrant was issued by a justice of the peace and placed in the hands of Sheriff Beall.

 

On the 15th of December the sheriff was informed that the Davenport gang intended to hold up the Memphis and Charleston pay car, due to pass through Burnsville that night. Sheriff Beall deputized Jim Patrick, Tom Wade, W. D. Davis, W. R. Smith and Jack Hardwick, and hastening to Burnsville

surrounding the town shortly after dark. Slowly closing in, the officers encountered the Davenport crowd, and in the pitched battle which followed, Jack Davenport was killed by W. R. Smith, and Tobe Charlton and a man named Luter, were captured, the remainder of the gang escaping. Sheriff Beall

also found in the town Port Lawson and Jess Weathers, for whom he had warrants charging misdemeanors, and they were arrested, but were in no manner connected with the Davenport gang.

 

The sheriff had more prisoners than he could safely escort to Jacinto with the small force at his command, as it was to be expected that the members of the gang who had made their escape would attempt to rescue their comrades. Leaving Charlton and Luter at the Burnsville depot under guard of the posse, and taking Lawson and Weathers, the sheriff hurried to Jacinto and safely landed his

prisoners in the county jail. Returning to Burnsville as soon as possible Sheriff Beall found that the Ku Klux had been there during his absence and had taken Charlton and Luter from the guard and shot them, the bodies being laid out on the depot platform. A few nights later Lawson and Weathers were taken from the county jail by the Ku Klux, of which organization it was supposed they were members, and liberated.

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Memphis Daily Appeal 18 Feb 1869: Early on Feb 16, at Burnsville, Miss, 3 men lost lives; a band of desperadoes had infested the country around Burnsville for some time, ever since the war, under Davenport. The gang had laid a plan to waylay and rob the M&C at Brownsville on Feb 15th and were betrayed and captured. The Sheriff started to take them to Jacinto, Miss and they were

overtaken by a party of men who took the prisoners from them and put them to death.

 

Athens (AL) Post 20 Feb 1869. Jack Davenport was shot and killed at Burnsville near Iuka, MS. Also his accomplices....R.D. Luter (should be K.D. Lewter of course) of Pulaski, TN....were taken from jail last night and shot....Luter and Charlton were from Limestone County (AL).

 

Memphis Daily Appeal 22 Feb 1869: According to the Iuka (Miss) Gazette the following were killed:......R.D. Luter of Pulaski in Tennessee..........As we go to press, we get a dispatch from Burnsville, stating that R.D. Luter of Pulaski, TN.....all thought to be accomplices of Jack Davenport, were taken from the calaboose (that's slang for jail) last night and shot. Their dead bodies are now lying on the platform.

 

The Corinth Herald (no date)........Slowly closing in the officers encountered the Davenport crowd and in the pitched battle that followed Jack Davenport was killed....and a man name Luter were captured, the remainder of the gang escaping.....Leaving Charlton and Luter at the Burnsville depot under guard, .....the sheriff hurried to Jacinto and safely landed his (other) prisoners in jail. Returning to Burnsville....(he) found that the Ku Klux had been there during his absence and taken Charlton and Luter from the guard and shot them, the bodies being laid out on the depot platform. A few nights later, (the prisoners in the county jail were taken) by the Ku Klux, of which organization it was supposed they were members, and liberated.

 

Ok, these are just bits and pieces, but you'll notice the versions are slightly different. The Corinth Herald was probably a later version, when all the facts had come in, whereas the earlier papers, reporting the event immediately, did not have all the facts yet (remember this WAS 1869!!).

 

His dad Kinchen Lewter died in Sept 1868. The estate records simply state that although Kinchen D. was alive at the time of his father's death, he was now deceased. Kinchen D's widow Margaret (CAVE) and their children were living with Kinchen D's mom Jincy/Jane Lewter in the 1870 census. Margaret and kids later moved to Arkansas, and she did remarry.

 

Hope this is of interest!

 

Susan

 

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THE ATHENS POST

Saturday February, February 20, 1869

Kinchen D. Lewter, Jr.

Horse Thieves Shot— Jack Davenport, alleged to be a notorious horse thief and murderer, was killed at Barnesville, 8 miles from this place, last night. He has several accomplices, and the people have a sharp watch on them. The community have determined to rid themselves of outlaws, and the sooner

the gentry leave, the safer will be their physiognomies.

 

Just as we go to press we received a dispatch from Brunsville, stating that Tobe Charlton,, of Eastport, R. D. Lewter, of Pulaski, Tenn., and George Kincaid, of Moscow, Tenn., all thought to be accomplices of Jack Davenport, were taken from the caloboose last night and shot. Their dead bodies are now lying on the platform.__Iuka Gazette

The body of Luter is now at the depot at Athens.

(Spelling left as is but it should be K. D. instead of R. D. Lewter)

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THE ATHENS POST

Saturday, February 27, 1869

The Horse Thieves

Last week we published an item taken from the Iuka Gazette, in reference to some horse thieves being taken from jail at Burnsville, and shot. Among the number were two former citizens of this place-Kinchen Luter and Tobe Charlton---and, by the way, were not very favorable looked upon by our citizens. The body of Luter arrived here last Saturday morning, addressed to the care of Col. A. L.

McKinney, who immediately turned it over to the relatives of the deceased. It is said that Tobe Charlton was a relative of the man who assassinated Major Fen Ragsdale, at Somerville, some time ago. There are some forty or fifty scoundrels, whose names are in the hands of the authorities, and we have no doubt but what they will all be caught, and when they are, we presume some neighborhoods will be considerable depopulated. Let the work go on, until men are satisfied with their own, and property and life are secure all over the land. Every good citizen in the country is literately tired of this condition of affairs.

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Death Notices from Limestone Co., Al. Newspapers 1828-1891 Athens Public Library 929.3

Athens Post (continued)

February 20, 1869

David Burke was killed by an explosion at Carendelet, Missouri yesterday.

Jack Davenport was shot and killed at Burnsville near Iuka, Mississippi. Also, his accomplices, Toby Carlton of Eastport, R. D. Luter of Pulaski, Tennessee and George Kinkaid of Moscow, Tennessee were taken from jail last night and shot. From the Iuka (Mississippi), Gazette was copied the belief that Tobe Charlton was a relative of the man who assassinated Major Fen Ragsdale at Somerville.

Luter and Charlton were from Limestone County.

 

Note: This information was sent to me by Bobby Lewter not long before he passed away. Bobby put a little note on the top of the paper saying, —This is your kinfolk, Nada!— I just laughed when I read that!

Nada

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A Newspaper Article about Kinchen D. Lewter

This article appeared in a historical edition of the Corinth Herald dated December 15, 1903. It recounts the events leading to the death of Kinchen D. Lewter at the hands of members of the Ku Klux Klan. Kinchen D. Lewter was the first husband of Margaret (Maggie) Mae Cave, daughter of James Cave and Rebecca Garrett Gardner.

 

Two Killed at Burnsville In the fall of 1868 Jack Hardwick hauled to Burnsville and sold a bale of cotton. Later in the day he was held up in the streets and the money taken from him by Jack Davenport, who was credited with being the leader of a gang of hard characters infesting that neighborhood. Hardwick subcribed to an affidavit setting forth the above facts and a warrant was issued by a justice of the peace and placed in the hands of Sheriff Beall. On the 15th of December the sheriff was informed that the Davenport gang intended to hold up the Memphis and Charleston pay car, due to pass through Burnsville that night. Sheriff Beall deputized Jim Patrick, Tom Wade, W. D. Davis, W. R. Smith and Jack Hardwick, and hastening to Burnsville surrounding the town shortly after

dark. Slowly closing in, the officers encountered the Davenport crowd, and in the pitched battle which followed, Jack Davenport was killed by W. R. Smith, and Tobe Charlton and a man named Luter, were captured, the remainder of the gang escaping. Sheriff Beall also found in the town Port Lawson and Jess Weathers, for whom he had warrants charging misdemeanors, and they were arrested, but were in no manner connected with the Davenport gang. The sheriff had more prisoners than he could safely escort to Jacinto with the small force at his command, as it was to be expected that the members of the gang who had made their escape would attempt to rescue their comrades. Leaving Charlton and Luter at the Burnsville depot under guard of the posse, and taking Lawson and Weathers, the sheriff hurried to Jacinto and safely landed his prisoners in the county jail. Returning to Burnsville as soon as possible Sheriff Beall found that the Ku Klux had been there during his absence and had taken Charlton and Luter from the guard and shot them, the bodies being laid out on the depot platform. A few nights later Lawson and Weathers were taken from the county jail by the Ku

Klux, of which organization it was supposed they were members, and liberated.

 

 

Notes for Margaret (Maggie) Mae Nave (Cave?):

 

Margaret continued to live in Giles County, Tn., then later in Limestone County, Al. Eventually she moved to Clark County, Ark. Not sure if her move was before or after her remarriage. But, on June 24, 1884, Maggie M. Lewter purchased a lot in Arkadelphia, Davis Cemetery, possibly in Clark County, Ark.

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Margaret, Kinchen's widow, was living with Kinchen's Mother in 1870 Census.

1870 Census, Dist. 1, Giles County, Tn. 24 August 1870, Page 15

96 96 Luter, Jane 70 F W Farmer 1900 300 NC

Marthy 23 F W Keep House Al.

Liley 7 F W Miss.

William 3 F W Tn.

Jessie 1 F W Tn.

Alexander 23 M W Farmer Al.

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Margaret died in 1907. I would assume that Margaret really lived in Hebron

in Clark County, as the community was shown on the 1895 map. However, this

community does not exist today. The town of Hebron in Cleveland did NOT

exist in 1895, so probably also did not exist in 1907. Another reason to

have access to older maps. (And we thought just the different spelling of

Luter/Lewter could drive us crazy!!!!)

Sandy G.

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Annual and final accounts for James Cave, dec'd (1863).

Heirs listed include Margaret Suter (Suitor) and husband who reside at

Elkton, Giles Co, TN.

Clark co, AR Deed Book 12, p. 485: James S. Boswell and W. E. Boswell his

wife, consideration of $250 paid by Maggie M. LEWTER, south 2/3 of lot ten

of Hardy & Barkman addition subdivion of Arkadelphia, 24 June 1884.

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Margaret and George W. Jones were divorced 11 Aug 1888 in Clark Co, AR.

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1900 census, Clark co, AR, Anderson twp, ED 3, sheet 3A, line 80, family 58.

J. B. Avery, 61, Mar 1839, m. 35 yrs, b. AL, GA, GA

MM Avery, 52, Sept 1847, m. 39 years, AL, VA, AL, No children

W. L. Warren, boarder

Married years must be total for all her marriages, and no children must mean

by 2nd husband.

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Obit collection from Southern Standard:

"We learned from S. C. Karr of Hebron of the death of this old friend, which

occurred at their home near Hebron about 10PM on Sunday night. The cause of

death, we understand , was catarrh [inflammation of mucous membrane] of the

stomach. Mrs. Avery was about 60 years old and had been married to Mr. Avery

for about 17 years. She was formerly a Mrs. Lawter (sic) and lived here in

Arkadelphia (AR) for several years." No date for this obit; must be 1904.

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Gravestone says she was b. 10 Mar 1849. Buried in Section 3, tws 10 S, row

18 W.

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Matthias T., Margaret's former brother in law, gave a deposition in the divorce proceedings of Margaret Cave Lewter Jones, his former sister-in-law, who was abandoned by George W. Jones shortly after their marriage.